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A few nice doctor strange images I found:

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doctor strange
Image by fabola

Top shelf (1)
doctor strange
Image by Yvesanemone
My second book shelf holds my fiction, which I’ve organized by most influential down to least (or oldest). It’s a rough organization at best (I’m not THAT obsessive). This is the first shelf: Essays on the Odyssey by Charles H. Taylor, Jr., Homer’s The Odyssey, translated by E. V. Rieu, Homer’s Odyssey, Modern Library College Editions, The Odyssey, Homer, Translated by Robert Fitzgerald (most of these I got at yard sales, intending to compare the different versions; I still haven’t read them yet), The Aeneid of Virgil, translated by C. Day Lewis, The Aeneid of Virgil, translated by Rolfe Humphries, The Historie of the Damnable Life, and deserved death of Doctor John Faustus, modernized and edited by Dr. William Rose (I searched long and hard for this one; I wanted the Faust story as I intend on creating a modernized version. This "modernized" version is from 1963, the first paperback edition from a volume first published in 1923 as a reprint of the English version from 1592, which itself was first published in Germany in 1587; the only modernization is the spelling and punctuation. The author insists that the version by Thoms in Early English Prose is later than this one, most likely 1700, so there must have been some controversy in the 1920s as to which version was most accurate. However, considering that this one was adopted by the University of Notre Dame and reprinted, as it could not be found in most libraries, if it’s not the most accurate version, it certainly is the most annotated), Goethe’s Faust, an abridged version translated by Louis MacNeice (this book caused me to look up the Doctor Faustus book, as I discovered that Goethe’s Faust is different from the Faust story I had heard about and wanted to update, this was another yard sale book, I wouldn’t purchase an abridged version now), The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm Volume I, translated by Jack Zipes, J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, Cervantes by Don Quixote, The Sound and The Fury by William Faulkner, The Syndic and A Mile Beyond the Moon by Cyril M. (C.M.) Kornbluth and Gunner Cade by C.M. Kornbluth & Judith Merril (C.M. Kornbluth became my favorite science fiction writer after I’d read a few of his stories in the Isaac Asimov/Martin Greenberg-edited Greatest SF stories books; his "The Marching Morons" and "The Little Black Bag" stories have stuck with me until this day, and Black Bag was adapted for television several times, including in Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, which I enjoyed. Sadly, he died of a heart attack at age 34 after running to catch a train, which, incidentally, has always tied his fate in my mind to that of Patrick Nagel, an artist who also died of a heart attack after 15 minutes of aerobic exercise at 38. I guess the takeaway is that writers should either watch their health or not tax their bodies by overexerting themselves). I like Kornbluth because his stories are well-written and smart, betraying a cynicism mixed with sympathy for the human condition, much like the intelligence of a Kubrick film. I also like him because he didn’t like Asimov. Asimov explains this regretfully in his introduction to Black Bag in The Great SF Stories: 12. He doesn’t seem to take offense, but he is confused as to why he could be disliked. He surmises that it’s because of his boisterous laugher at the gatherings of the "Futurians" (a name I’m convinced Asimov gleefully came up with himself), but perhaps the real reason is because he was an obnoxious blowhard. The books continue with D.H. Lawrence’s The Complete Short Stories Volume Two (purchased for college), The Godfather by Mario Puzo, Dante’s Inferno translated by John Ciardi, Shakespeare’s Hamlet and The Tempest (both from high school), Thoreau’s Walden and "Civil Disobedience", Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, The Autobiography And Other Writings by Benjamin Franklin, Selected Writings Of Ralph Waldo Emerson (also high school for these two), followed by Burning Chrome, Mona Lisa Overdrive, Neuromancer, and Count Zero, all by William Gibson, then Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson, Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino (college), J.G. Ballard’s Crash (in which the character of Vaughan became a favorite, and influenced my fondness for the actor Elias Koteas, who played the role in David Cronenberg’s movie version), Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell, and as if it wasn’t enough, a centennial edition of the same with a forward by Thomas Pynchon (more on him on the next shelf), then Heart of Darkness & The Secret Sharer by Joseph Conrad, and another version of Heart of Darkness, both purchased at yard sales (so I can afford to own two).