Riversleigh Fossil Museum in Mt Isa. Australian Megafauna from over 25,000 years ago in Queensland.

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Riversleigh Fossil Museum in Mt Isa. Australian Megafauna from over 25,000 years ago in Queensland.
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Megafauna included kangaroos, wombats, tigers similar to Tasmanain Tigers, possums etc.
Mount Isa Township.
Like Broken Hill Mt Isa is an isolated outback town created because of a mineral discovery in 1923. It was part of the Cloncurry Shire council until it was declared a town with its own local government in 1963. Today it has a population of around 20,000 people but at its peak in the 1970s it had 34,000 people. The city area encompasses a huge unpopulated area making Mt Isa the second biggest city in Australia in land area! The town is basically a mining company town like Broken Hill but unlike Broken Hill and other mining centres in Australia it is such a long way from the coast and port facilities. No mining town is further from the nearest port than Mt Isa. The port of Townsville is almost 900 kms away and the capital Brisbane is over 1800 kms away.

Pastoralism came to the Mt Isa region in the 1860s and 1870s when much of outback QLD was occupied by graziers. The region was known for its mining as the Cloncurry copper and goldfields were not that far away and to the south of Mt Isa was the Duchess copper mine and township. (In 1966 the only major source of phosphate was discovered at Duchess mine.) The rocky outcrops and ranges of the area were attractive to prospectors hoping for another great mineral find after the great finds at Cloncurry in 1872.

An itinerant mineral prospector named John Campbell Miles was camped on the Leichhardt River looking at rock samples in late 1923. He found promising samples and took them to the government assayer in Cloncurry discovering that his samples were 50% to 78% pure lead with copper as well. The QLD government investigated the deposits further as Miles named the field Mt Isa. Businessmen in Cloncurry saw the potential of the area for mining. In January 1924 the Mount Isa Mines Ltd Company was floated beginning their search for investment capital to develop the site. Douglas McGillivray of Cloncurry was a major investor and his funds permitted the new company to acquire mining leases for the relevant areas. Miners flocked to the area and by the end of 1924 a small town had emerged with tents, and a few wooden buildings from other towns in the region. Mt Isa then had a school room, a water supply from the Leichhardt River and stores, hotels and an open air picture theatre!

But it was to take another 10 years before large scale mining began. MIM (Mt Isa Mines) continued to purchases additional mining leases and they searched overseas for capital as the first leases cost them £245,000. On top for this was the cost of underground explorations, drilling, metallurgical tests and plant construction. By 1932 MIM had spent around £4 million with no production, returns or profits. But the size and potential of this project was not underestimated by anyone. In 1929 the QLD government extended the railway from Cloncurry ( it reached there in 1910) via Duchess to Mt Isa. By this time the population was around 3,000 people. Mined ore was carted by road to the smelter in Cloncurry. The township had progressed too with a town planned by the Company with tree lined streets on the river, with a dam for a water supply on Rifle Creek. The mine operations were on the western side of the River and the town and businesses on the eastern side of the River. The Catholic Church opened in 1929 and the Company built a fine small hospital for the town. As the Great Depression hit MIM stopped spending on the development on the town and concentrated on the mines. By this time profits were repaying interest on the loans but the company did not return a dividend on investments until 1947.

The fortunes of Mt Isa Mines changed in the 1930s as Julius Kruttschnitt, a native of New Orleans was appointed mine manager in 1930. He obtained additional financial investment in MIM from the American Smelting and Refining Company and the first reruns on lead production occurred in 1931. By 1937 under Kruttschnitt’s guidance the almost bankrupt company of 1930 was returning profits by 1936. This manager was known for always wearing a collar, tie and suit regardless of the Mt Isa temperatures. He played sport with the miners, his wife contributed to town events and he worked on better housing for the workers. He retired from the MIM in 1953 but remained on the Company Board until 1967. At this time Mt Isa Mines became the largest single export earner for Australia and MIM was the largest mining company in Australia. Kruttschnitt died in 1974 in Brisbane. He received many Australiana and international awards for his work in mining engineering and metallurgy. He really put Mt Isa on the map.

During World War Two the mine concentrated on copper and ceased lead and silver operations as demanded by the war needs. Until this time the mine had concentrated on lead production. Labour shortages were crippling during the War years but the mine continued. Many American troops were stationed here too and the Mt Isa Hospital had an underground hospital built in case of air raids. No bombing attacks were experienced and the hospital was mainly used by nurses on night duty catching up on some sleep in the relative cool underground but the hospital still remains and is operated by the National Trust. It is unlikely that we will have free time when the underground hospital is open to visit it.
After World War Two the fortunes of Mt Isa changed remarkably. Lead prices trebled after the War from £25 per ton to £91 per ton and hence the MIM was able to pay its first dividends in 1947. Workers received a lead bonus to make their wages higher and about three times the amount of average wages in Brisbane. The population of the town doubled in the early 1950s just before Kruttschnitt retired from around 3,000 to over 7,000. It doubled again by 1961 when the population reached 13,000 and it doubled again by 1971 when it reached 26,000. New facilities came with the bigger population- an Olympic size swimming pool, some air conditioning in some buildings, bitumen roads, less dust, more hotels and employee clubs, including the Marie Kruttschnitt Ladies Club! Miners’ wages doubled during the Korean War. It was during this period the rail line from Mt Isa to Townsville became the profitable ever for the Queensland Railways. It was the profits from this line that led Queensland Rail to develop and rebuilt other lines and introduce the electric Tilt train etc. MIM discovered more and more ore deposits and firstly doubled and then trebled production in the 1950s. Mt Isa surpassed Broken Hill as Australia’s biggest and wealthiest mine.

New suburbs were built by MIM, the town became the centre of local government and the Company built a new dam for a water supply on Lake Moondarra with importer sand for a lake shore beach. As more stores opened in Mt Isa Mount Isa mines closed its cooperative store. A large new hospital was opened in 1960; the Royal Flying Doctor Service transferred its headquarters from Cloncurry to Mt Isa; and the town had a new air of prosperity and modernity. The calm soon broke. There was a major split between the Australian Workers Union, an Americana union agitator called Patrick Mackie and the Mine management over pay and profit sharing ideas. All work at the mine stopped during a bitter dispute that lasted eight months. The Liberal Country Party government which included Joh Bjelke Petersen (he was a minster and not premier in 1964) used the police to restrict the activities of the AWU and the Mackie Unionists. Many miners left the town as they could not survive without work and it took some time after the dispute resolution for the mine to restart full operations. Mining restarted in 1965.

Ten years (1974) later MIM financially assisted with the construction and opening of the new Civic Centre. Mt Isa’s population reached its maximum of around 34,000 and the future looked bright. As the ore quality declined the town population declined but MIM found new ways of extracting copper and lead from lower grade ore. The city continued to exist until MIM sold utu to Xstrata in 2003. Since the then town population has been slowly increasing. The local federal MP is Bob Katter who is proposing to create a new conservative party for the next federal election.

Mount Isa Mines Today.
In the 2001 Census over 20% of Mt Isa’s workforce was employed in mining. The town mainly survives because of the Xstrata Mines which took over the previous company, Mount Isa Mines (MIM) Ltd in 2003. Xstrata has invested 0 million in the mines since its takeover. Xstrata today employs over 3,000 staff and 1,000 contractors in the mine. Xstrata is a large multinational mining company with its headquarters in Switzerland and its head office in London. It has mines in Africa, Australia, Asia and the Americas. It miens coal, and copper primarily in Australia at places as far apart as Mt Isa, McArthur River zinc mine in the NT, Bulga coal mine and Anvil Hill coal mine in NSW and Cosmos nickel mine in WA.

Apart from the mines itself Mt Isa has other infrastructure: a power station (oil fired); an experimental mine dam; and various buildings and works such as the winding plant, shaft headframe etc. Most importantly for the township it also has the copper smelter works. The ore is further processed in the Townsville smelter after transportation to the coast. The Mt Isa smelter produced over 200,000 tons of copper in 2010 and smelted lead and the concentrator refines the ores of copper, zinc, lead and silver. Across all its mines in Australia Xstrata employs almost 10,000 people second only to its workforce in Africa. Xstrata also operates the Ernest Henry copper, gold and magnetite mines 38 kms north of Cloncurry. This group of mines is expected to employ around 500 people on a long term basis. All the ore from these mines is treated in the concentrator and the smelter in Mt Isa. The Isa smelter and concentrator also handles the silver, lead and zinc from the George Fisher( Hilton) mines 20 kms south of Mt Isa. The stack from the smelter, erected in 1978, stands 270 metres high and can be seen from 40 kms away.

Outback at Isa Discovery Centre and Riversleigh Fossil Centre.
This centre was opened in 2003. The Riversleigh Fossil Centre moved into the complex; a purpose built mine called the Hard Times mine was dug and opened to give visitors an underground mine experience; and the Isa Experience Gallery opened with an Outback Park outside. The complex also operates the Visitor Information Centre. The Isa Experience Gallery uses multimedia approaches to bring the history and Aboriginal culture and mining background of Mount Isa to life.

Riversleigh World Heritage fossil site is 250kms north of Mt Isa on the Gregory River on an isolated cattle station. The fossil site covers over 10,000 hectares and is now included in the Lawn Hill national Park. It has been a protected site since 1983 and was declared a World Heritage site of international significance in 1994. But why? Sir David Attenborough explains:

Riversleigh is the worlds’ richest mammal fossil site dating from 15-25 million years ago. The massive number of fossils discovered here are generally imbedded in hard limestone which was formed when freshwater pools solidified. This happened at time when this part of Australia was a rich rainforest area, rather than the semi-arid grassland that it is now. The fossils cover a period of 20 million years helping scientists understand how Australia, its climate and animal species changed. Most of what is known about Australia’s mammals over 20 million years was learnt from bone discoveries at Riversleigh, and the most significant ones were found in just one hour!

It is the mammals that we find the most fascinating today with large mega-fauna from prehistoric eras the most amazing. But there have also been finds of birds, frogs, fish, turtles and reptiles. The finds have included: the ancestors of Tasmanian Tigers (thylacines); large meat eating kangaroos; huge crocodiles; giant flightless birds; the ancestors of our platypus (monotreme); ancient koalas and wombats; diprotodon; giant marsupial moles and bandicoots; around 40 species of bats; and marsupial “lions”. The site has yielded a complete skull and teeth of a giant platypus and the various thylacines have added to our previous knowledge of just one- the now extinct Tasmanian Tiger.

Scientists have dug over 250 fossil rich sites at Riversleigh finding hundreds of new species. Who has heard of: dasyurids, cuscuses, ilariids and wynyardiids? I have no idea what they were. Other strange discoveries have been: ‘Thingodonta’ (Yalkaparidon) – an odd marsupial with skull and teeth like no other living marsupial; Fangaroo- a small grass eating kangaroo species with giant teeth; the Giant Rat-kangaroo, (Ekaltadeta) that ate meat( perhaps the Fangaroo); and the Emuary, (Emuarius) which was half emu and half cassowary in features. The Fossil Centre in Mt Isa has some reconstructions of some of these fossil animals of prehistoric times.

Image taken from page 3 of ‘Very Long Odds and a Strange Finish. [Tales.]’
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Title: "Very Long Odds and a Strange Finish. [Tales.]"
Author: BROWN, Campbell Rae.
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 12622.i.48."
Page: 3
Place of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1893
Publisher: G. Routledge & Sons
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000491764

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Image from page 383 of “Battles and leaders of the Civil War : being for the most part contributions by Union and Confederate officers, based upon “The Century war series.”” (1887)

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Image from page 383 of “Battles and leaders of the Civil War : being for the most part contributions by Union and Confederate officers, based upon “The Century war series.”” (1887)
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Identifier: battlesleadersof21john
Title: Battles and leaders of the Civil War : being for the most part contributions by Union and Confederate officers, based upon "The Century war series."
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Johnson, Robert Underwood, 1853-1937. ed. cn Buel, Clarence Clough, 1850-1933, ed
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Publisher: New-York : Century
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center

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. Itflashed upon mymind how, in the Mexican war, as his regiment filed past, I had almost afatherly fear lest he should be struck; and now he was here, wounded byone of my own men! He was tenderly cared for by my medical director,Doctor Mott, and I was delighted to learn that he would not lose his leg.The next morning General John F. Reynolds was brought in as a prisoner.He had been my messmate in the old army for more than a year, andfor lialf that time my tent-mate. Not an unkind word had ever passedT)etween us. General Reynolds seemed confused and mortified at his posi-tion. He sat down and covered his face with his hands, and at lengthsaid: Hill, we ought not to bi> enemies. I told him that there wasno bad feeling on mv part, and that he ought not to fret at the fortunesof war, which were notoriouslv fickle. He was placed in my ambulance andsent over to Richmond, do.-lining a loan of Confederate money. GeneralReynolds had gone to sleep in the woods between the battle-ground and

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CAPTURED BY STONEWALL JACKSON HIMSELF. LEES ATTACKS NORTH OF THE CHICKAHOMINY. 361 the Chickahominy, and when he awoke, his troops were gone and the bridgewas broken down. Winder, Anderson, and Garland, probably the most promising of all ouryoung brigadiers, fell fighting for the cause they loved. Reynolds, one of thenoblest of mankind, fell doing his duty on his side at Gettysbmg. Sykes, asthe friend of McClellan, never received the recognition which his knightlyqualities demanded. Worst of all, Porter, who commanded on the field themost creditable to the Federal arms, received that condemnation so muchworse than death from the country he had served ably and loyally. In these battles, the great want with the Confederates, strange as it mayseem, was accmate knowledge of the country in their front. The map fur-nished me (and I suppose the six other major-generals had no better) wasvery full in regard to everything within our own lines; but a red line on theeast side of the Chickahominy

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Day 233: “Beautiful White Wash” by Annie Wellborn – Hanging in My Foyer
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I have many of her paintings hanging on my walls because she is ALMOST kinfolk. My daddy’s daddy had many siblings. One brother was mentally-challenged and married a mentally-challenged woman. They had several children. Since intelligence goes toward the middle, one of the sons had normal intelligence and married a country girl, and they had several children who have lived normal, productive lives. After her husband’s death (many years later), that country girl was very sick and receiving rehabilitation in a hospital. They attempted to teach her to paint by regular standards. She told them she couldn’t do that and began painting in her own way. Her doctor loved the paintings and began selling them. After she returned to her humble home near Athens, GA; she continued to sell paintings as a means of income. She continues to take care of her deceased husband’s mentally-challenged brother.

To make a long story short, she is my daddy’s first cousin’s wife. She signs her paintings, "Annie Wellborn." At family gatherings many years ago, we always just called her, Geraldine.

In 1992, I had a 50th wedding anniversary party for my parents. It was held in a nice hotel in Athens, GA. One of the items on our private food table was steamed snow peas. Geraldine came to the party alone since her husband (my daddy’s 1st cousin) was very ill. At the celebration, folks were allowed to stand and talk about my parents. During Geraldine’s talk she made a comment about the food. She said, "What about those peas. They didn’t shell them. Look at all the time we wasted in the past shelling peas." She is a very interesting and funny lady.

Another strange bit of information is the fact that my mother’s name is Annie Wellborn, but she’s a different person.

Geraldine has even introduced her brother-in-law, Carter, to drawing. He has had showings of his drawings. www.onlineathens.com/stories/111303/ent_20031113014.shtml It just shows me that God is very faithful, and when He says He will take care of you, He means it. Carter is my daddy’s mentally-challenged 1st cousin.

365 Days

Image from page 178 of “The boy travellers in the Russian empire: adventures of two youths in a journey in European and Asiatic Russia, with accounts of a tour across Siberia..” (1886)

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Identifier: boytravellersinr00knox
Title: The boy travellers in the Russian empire: adventures of two youths in a journey in European and Asiatic Russia, with accounts of a tour across Siberia..
Year: 1886 (1880s)
Authors: Knox, Thomas Wallace, 1835-1896
Subjects: Soviet Union — Description and travel Siberia (Russia)
Publisher: New York : Harper & brothers
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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A BUSINESS TRANSACTION. EEFORMS OF ALEXANDER II. 171 Having stated tlie business, you invite the man to smoke (everybodysmokes in Russia), and then you hand him the cigar-case and turn yourback to the window, or look intently at something on the table. Hehelps himself to a cigar, and also to the money, and then the affair goeson easily, What a rascally business! exclaimed both the youths in a breath.Doctor Bronson fully echoed their sentiment, and said he earnestly hopedthe condition of things was not as bad as it is portrayed. Alexander II.made a considerable improvement in many things during Iiis reign, theDoctor continued, and it is to be lioped that he reformed the official sys-tem of the Empire in this particular feature.

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PKTEK THE GREAT DRESSED FOR BATTLE. 172 THE BOY TRAVELLERS IN THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE. CHAPTER IX. STUDIES OF ST. PETERSBURG.—MUJIKS.— THE IMPERIAL NOSEGAY.—A SHORTHISTORY OF RUSSIAN SERFDOM.—ITS ORIGIN, GROWTH, AND ABUSES.—EMANCI-PATION OF THE SERFS.—PRESENT CONDITION OF THE PEASANT CLASS.—SEF^ING THE EMPEROR.—HOW THE CZAR APPEARS IN PUBLIC—PUBLIC AND SE-CRET POLICE.—THEIR EXTRAORDINARY POWERS.—ANECDOTES OF POLICESEVERITY.—RUSSIAN COURTS OF LAW. FOR the remainder of their stay in tlie capital Doctor Bronson and tlieyouths were more leisurely in their mov^ements than during the firstfew days. They dismissed the guide, as they felt that they could goaround without his aid, though they occasionally re-engaged him for spe-cial trips when they thouglit their inexperience would he a bar to theirprogress. In thus acting they followed out a plan adopted long before. On ar-riving in a strange city where time was limited, they engaged a guide, inorder that they miglit do the

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Image from page 213 of “Science in story. Sammy Tubbs, the boy doctor, and “Sponsie,” the troublesome monkey” (1874)

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Image from page 213 of “Science in story. Sammy Tubbs, the boy doctor, and “Sponsie,” the troublesome monkey” (1874)
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Identifier: scienceinstorysa00foot
Title: Science in story. Sammy Tubbs, the boy doctor, and "Sponsie," the troublesome monkey
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors: Foote, Edward B. (Edward Bliss), 1829-1906
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Murray Hill Publishing Co.

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CHAPTER X. BAD NEWS—THE RETARDATOR AND ACCELERA-TOR NERVES—A TRAGEDY IN SHIN-BONEALLEY–THE DEATH OF SOME PETS—SAMMYSSORROW—THE DOCTOR DIVERTS HIS MINDWITH INTERESTING CONVERSATION RESPECT-ING OUR NERVOUS TELEGRAPH, AND HOW WELEARN TO USE IT—THE STRANGE RESOLU-TION OF SAMMY. USH! hush! Be quiet!my young readers. I havesome bad news to com-municate ! I hardly knowjust how I should break itto you, for physiologyteaches us that the ner-vous bridle which thebrain puts on the heartbecomes more or less un-manageable when anygreat or sudden emotionof the mind occurs. Thatis, it fails more than ever to be controlled by the

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THE TROUBLESOME MONKEY. 209 will. It is through this involuntary action of therctardator and accelerator nerves belonging to thepncumogastric pair, that life is endangered some-times by the sudden communication of either sor-rowful or over-joyful news. We should be verycareful, therefore, in our intercourse with nervouslysensitive people, not to seriously disturb the har-monious action of those nerves which reach downfrom the brain, and communicate all its emotions°f J°y> grief, horror, surprise, anger, and fear.It is a common peculiarity of the human mind tolike to surprise people with either good or badnews, or to visit them unexpectedly. Look outthat this inclination is not gratified at the expense*of the health and perhaps life of those with whomyou associate. Now, how shall I tell you the distressing newswhich you must know some time unless I cut mynarrative short by abruptly closing this volumewithout an additional word ? I will see if I canlead you along so as to gradually

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Image from page 177 of “McCarver and Tacoma” (1906)
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Title: McCarver and Tacoma
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Prosch, Thomas Wickham, 1850-1915
Subjects: McCarver, Morton Matthew, 1807-1875 Tacoma (Wash.) — History
Publisher: Seattle, Lowman & Hanford
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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60 The Early Carr, Miss Marietta Carr, Frank Spinning, Mrs. Amanda Spin-ning, Lucius V. Starr, James W. King, Thomas Hood, DavidCanfield, James W. Law, William Mahon, William P. Byrd,M. M. McCarver, Mrs. Julia A. McCarver, Miss Virginia Mc-Carver, Miss Elizabeth M. McCarver and Miss Naomi Mc-Carver. On the Puyallup Indian Reservation were C. H.Spinning, the doctor; Thomas Elder, the farmer; A. W. Stew-

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Tacoma Harbar in 1868. Map of Land Claims Tacoma Townsite. art, the carpenter; John Flett, the blacksmith : and WilliamClendenin, the storekeeper. These men all had families. TheClendenin store was a great convenience to the people up thevalley, as well as to those on the harbor. The latter went to itin boats and canoes for their clothing, hardware and groceries.From the country they came with their butter and eggs. Whenhe had accumulated a goodly supply of these products, lie Histcry of Tacoma I 61 would get together his Indian crew, load up his big canoe, androw and sail to Seattle, whore he would exchange his producefor things needed on the shelves of his store. Life on the !>uthai summer was. in its quietude, in strange contrast with thenoise of to-day. Indians could he heard talking a mile away,while the rowing of a boat could easily he heard two miles.( >ne foggy evening tin- steamer Eliza Anderson came in, onher way from Victoria to Olympia. She repeatedly blew herwhistl

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Image from page 366 of “Tri-State medical journal” (1895)

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Identifier: tristatemedicalj2189ball
Title: Tri-State medical journal
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Authors: Ball, James Moores, 1863-1929
Subjects: Tri-State Medical Society Medicine
Publisher: St. Louis : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: The College of Physicians of Philadelphia Historical Medical Library
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ST. LI KE S IK

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GRACE HOSPITAL. gladly open Grace Hospital for the inspection of regular physicians. All of these institutions can be visited with pleasure and profit. It cer-tainly speaks well for Detroit that she possesses so many hospitals andhomes. Of course, we must take into consideration the fact that Detroit isthe metropolis of the great State of Michigan. 358 In The Professional Eye. Should any of the visiting doctors find themselves in the anomalousposition of the man who sang: For I am a stranger and a long way fromhome, the Home for the Friendless will doubtless open its doors of mercy and give shelter to the wanderer. The medical schools of De-troit are two in number. TheDetroit Medical College and TheMichigan College of Medicineand Surgery. The professioncan well be proud of both. Detroit has always been fortu -nate in possessing a progressive,intelligent and refined profes-sion. In years past it has hap-pened frequently that her eminentphysicians and surgeons havebeen called to profess

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Image from page 56 of “The young Nimrods in North America : a book for boys” (1881)
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Identifier: youngnimrodsinno00knox
Title: The young Nimrods in North America : a book for boys
Year: 1881 (1880s)
Authors: Knox, Thomas Wallace, 1835-1896
Subjects:
Publisher: New York : Harper & Brothers

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hough out for a pleasantpromenade. George was about to shout, but the Doctor checked him, as he hadseen the strange object a moment before it came in the range of theyouths eyes. Thats a fox, whispered the Doctor; keep still, and see how grace-fully he runs. The Doctor stood still, and so did Joe, and they made a signal for theboys to do likewise. All four were as motionless as statues, and evident-ly the fox did 7iot see them, as he circled around the clearing and passedwithin a dozen yards of the boys. After making this circuit, he disap-peared in the forest at right angles to the way he came. What a beautiful head he has! said George, after the fox had gone.u His eyes are clear and bright, his nose is pointed, and the position of hisears gives him an expression of cunning. I have seen his picture before,but never knew how handsome he really is. As cunning as a fox, is an old adage, Uncle Joe remarked, andyou have just seen an instance of the animals cunning. AS CUNNING AS A FOX. 53

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KEYXAHU S PORTRAIT. .. How was that f Harry asked. The turning lie made in the clearing, Joe replied. It was tothrow the dogs off the scent. Listen! there they come; I hear theirbarking. Stand perfectly still, and see what they will do. The baying of the dogs was every moment more and more distinct,and in a few minutes four hounds came out of the forest on the track ofthe fox. On they went across the clearing as fast as they could run, andaway from the track. Yery soon they found they were off the scent, and back they came tothe clearing. They followed the fence the wrong way, and made the en-tire circuit of the open space before they found the track and renewedthe scent. They lost some fifteen or twenty minutes by this manoeuvreof the fox, and it is quite possible, as the Doctor suggested, that this trickgave him time to get to a place of safety. Does he have a den like the rabbit f one of the boys asked. Yes; he lives underground, but does not always make his own bur-row. He prefers

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Identifier: newnewguinea00grim
Title: The new New Guinea
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Grimshaw, Beatrice Ethel
Subjects: Papua New Guinea — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia : J. B. Lippincott London : Hutchinson
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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lance of the morning.St. Aignan, like Sud-Est, has been worked out, andonly provides the slenderest living for the seven oreight white men who still cling to the island. There were three white women not long ago, butthere is only one now. Thereupon depends a story—one of the strange, true, unbelievable stories of Papua,which he who likes may credit. A white woman lived here on Misima, far awayfrom the remotest echoes of civilisation, for manyyears, with her husband, who was one of the earlyminers. He died, and she kept on his claim, thoughshe was now very old, and worked it herself. Aftersome years of this strange, lonely life, the old ladybecame ill, and had to go down to Queensland to seea doctor. While there, regaining her health, shemade up her mind to endure her solitary life nolonger, but to bring back with her to Misima a com-panion who would share her labours and profits, andlighten the dullness of existence on that uttermostisle. She chose, not a second husband, not a young

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INDEPENDENCE 305 woman, but another white-haired old lady of her ownage, one who had been left ill off, and feared a life ofdependence. In the quiet home lands, an old ladywho has lived her life and become conservative andstiff in mind and body looks for an almshouse orinstitution to end her days in, if she is ill providedwith means of support, or at most seeks a position aschaperon or caretaker or companion. They do thingsdifferently in Queensland. The ancient dameselected by the heroine of Sud-Est answered gallantlyto the call, and the two old women actually set outfor the wilds of Papua together, travelling by steamerto Samarai, and thence, some days in a risky littlecutter, to Misima. Arrived there, they went onworking the first old womans claim, and liveddecently on what they made, asking help from noone, self-respecting, industrious, and independent. I should have liked well to meet these two pluckyold Australians, and had been looking forward to myvisit to Misima for that reaso

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Image from page 512 of “The Southern states of North America: a record of journeys in Louisiana, Texas, the Indian territory, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West V

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Image from page 512 of “The Southern states of North America: a record of journeys in Louisiana, Texas, the Indian territory, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West V
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Identifier: southernstatesof00kingrich
Title: The Southern states of North America: a record of journeys in Louisiana, Texas, the Indian territory, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and Maryland
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: King, Edward, 1848-1896
Subjects: Southern States — Description and travel
Publisher: London : Blackie & son
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Big Pigeon valley; and away to the south andsouth-east stretches the chain of the Richland Balsam. The dry and pure air of Waynesville gives new valueto life; the healthy man feels a strange glow and inspira-tion while in the shadow of these giant peaks. The townis composed of one long street of wooden houses, wan-dering from mountain base to mountain base. It has atrio of country stores; a cozy and delightful little hotel,nestling under the shade of a huge tree; an old woodenchurch perched on a hill, with a cemetery filled withancient tombs, where the early settlers he at rest, andan academy. There is no whir of wheels. The only manufacturingestablishments are flour-mills located on the variouscreeks and rivers, or a stray saw-mill; while here and there a wealthy landowner is building an elegant home with all the modern improvements. Bynine oclock at night there is hardly a hght in the village; a few belatedhorsemen steal noiselessly through the street, or the faint tinkle of a banjo

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The Carpenter —A Study fromWaynesville Life. 48 <S NOTKS FROM WAYNESVILLE. and the patter of a negros feet testify to an innocent merry-making. TheCourt-House of Haywood county, and the Jail, both modest two-story brick-structures, are the pubHc buildings, the Jail having only now and then aninmate, for the county is as orderly as a community of Quakers. The Mar-shal, as in most of these small Western North Carolina towns, is the power whichmaintains and enforces the law. No liquor is sold within a mile of the townsboundary ; some lonely and disreputable shanty, with the words BAR-ROOMinscribed upon it, on a clearing along the highway, being the only resort for thosewho drink spirits. The sheriff, the local clergyman, the county surveyor, andthe village doctor, ride about the country on their nags, gossiping and dreamilyenjoying the glorious air; nowhere is there bustle or noise of trade. The countycourts session is the event of the year ; the mail, brought forty-five miles overt

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Day Trips from Las Vegas: A Guide to the Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon is located in the United States of America in the State of Arizona and is a steep-sided gorge carved by the Colorado River. The Grand Canyon is 277miles long and ranges in width from 4 to 18miles and has a depth of more than a mile. The Grand Canyon is within the Grand Canyon National Park and is one of the world’s top natural attractions, reeling in a whooping five million visitors per year.

 

You can do many things at the Grand Canyon, even if you have just a few hours to explore it. You have to get out there to really be able to say you have seen the Grand Canyon. For starters and the casual sightseeing, head for the South Rim which is home to several historical buildings like the Kolb Studio, the Desert View Watchtower and the Grand Canyon Railway Depot. The Grand Canyon Skywalk is also another fantastic option for those who want to make the most out of their visit. The horse-shaped glass walkway stands at 1,200m in height above the floor of the canyon and allows you a great view into the main canyon.

 

Take a trip down to the floor of the valley by foot, mule back or by raft from upriver or take a hike throughout the Grand Canyon, a great way to see the park. Most visitors begin and end their hikes at the south rim. Long hikes await you with changes in elevation and terrain so be prepared and if you are really unsure but still want to hike nonetheless, get a professional guide to go with you to make sure your trip is a memorable one, instead of you hiking with the thought in your head swearing never to do this again.

 

For another way to see the Grand Canyon (Without much effort), Go on a Helicopter flight specially for tourists that flies over the Grand Canyon and gives you a remarkable birds eye view of this wonder. The Coconino Canyon Train is also another option for those who want a more laid-back leisurely view of the Canyon. A 90 minute train ride, it originates at the old Grand Canyon Depot and travels 24 miles throughout the landscapes of the canyon.

 

If you get hungry on your trip to the Grand Canyon, fret not for there are quite a few places to eat at from Bright Angel Restaurant and El Tovar Hotel Dining Room (think fine dining) on the South Rim and Café on the Rim and Coffee Saloon located on the North Rim.

 

Orson Johnson writes for Holiday Velvet, a website providing Las Vegas trips and rentals and USA vacation Rentals.

Image from page 140 of “The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and through the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and

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Image from page 140 of “The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and through the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and
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Identifier: boytravellersina00knox
Title: The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and through the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Knox, Thomas Wallace, 1835-1896 Harper & Brothers. pbl
Subjects: Voyages and travels Adventure and adventurers Tutors and tutoring Friendship Sailing Sailors Animals Natural history
Publisher: New York : Harper & Brothers
Contributing Library: School of Theology, Boston University
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston University

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hat the bishop hadcome, and the natives flocked to the beach to welcome him. Instead of the bishop it was a strange missionary, who spokeenouo^h of the lan^uaffe to make himself understood. He told themthat the bishop had had a fall the day before and broke his leg, andtherefore could not come on shore. He must hurry away to Sydneyto see a doctor, and could only stay a little while at the island, but hewanted to see his friends on board, and would like some yams and fruit. In the course of an hour or so fifty or more canoes are flying overthe water laden with presents for the good bishop. The fruit is passedon board, the men follow and are admitted two or three at a time, todescend into the bishops cabin, At the foot of the cabin-stairs they are met by half a dozen sailors,who put pistols to their heads, threaten to kill them if they make theleast outcry, tie their hands, and pass them along into the hold through TANNA ISLANDER ON A QUEENSLAND PLANTATION. FEUITS OF THE LABOR-TRADE. in

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118 THE BOY TEAVELLERS IN AUSTRALASIA. a hole which has been cut from the cabin for that purpose. When abatch has been thus disposed of another is allowed to descend, and in alittle while the hold is full; fifty or more natives have been made pris-oners, and meantime the strange missionary has returned from shore,the canoes are cut adrift or sunk by dropping pieces of iron into them,and the pretended missionary ship sails away with a cargo of slaves forthe Queensland or Feejee market.

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