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Image from page 160 of “Wonders of the tropics; or, Explorations and adventures of Henry M. Stanley and other world-renowned travelers, including Livingstone, Baker, Cameron, Speke, Emin Pasha, Du Chaillu, Andersson, etc., etc. ..” (1889)
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Identifier: wondersoftropics00nort
Title: Wonders of the tropics; or, Explorations and adventures of Henry M. Stanley and other world-renowned travelers, including Livingstone, Baker, Cameron, Speke, Emin Pasha, Du Chaillu, Andersson, etc., etc. ..
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Northrop, Henry Davenport, 1836-1909
Subjects: Stanley, Henry M. (Henry Morton), 1841-1904
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa. Chicago, Ill. [etc.] National Publishing Company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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e rolled himself about in the dust,screaming out Kina bomba! He had never before seen a white man,but had met with black native traders, who came, he said, for ivory, butnot for slaves. His wife would have been good looking, had she not ADVENTUROUS JOURNEY TO THE EAST COAST. 141 followed the custom of her country by knocking out her teeth. Monzesoon made himself at home, and presented the travellers with as muchfood as they required. As they advanced, the country oecame still more beautiful, aboundingwith large game. Often buffaloes were seen standing on eminences. Oneday, a buffalo was found lying down, and the doctor went to secure it forfood. Though the animal received three balls they did not prove fatal,and it turned round as if to charge. The doctor and his companionsran for shelter to some rocks, but before they gained them, they foundthat three elephants had cut off their retreat. The enormous brutes, how-ever, turned off, and allowed them to gain the rocks. As the buffalo was

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CURIOUS MODE OF SALUTING A STRANGER. moving rapidly away the doctor tried a long shot, and, to the satisfactionof his followers, broke the animals fore leg. The young men soonbrought it to a stand, and another shot in its brain settled it. They hadthus an abundance of food, which was shared by the villagers of theneighborhood. Soon afterwards an elephant was killed by his men. Leaving the Elephant Valley, they reached the residence of a chiefnamed Semalembue, who, soon after their arrival, paid them a visit, andpresented five or six baskets of meal and maize, and one of ground nuts,saying that he feared his guest would sleep the first night at his vil-lage hungry. The chief professed great joy at hearing the words of theGospel of Peace, replying: Now I shall cultivate largely, in the hopes 142 WONDERS OF THE TROPICS. of eating and sleeping in quiet. It is remarkable that all to whom thedoctor spoke, eagerly caught up the idea of living in peace as the proba-ble effect of the Gospel. T

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Image from page 67 of “Edward Hodges, doctor in music of Sydney Sussex College, Cambridge; organist … Bristol, England, 1819-1838; organist and director in Trinity Parish, New York, 1839-1859;” (1896)
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Identifier: edwardhodgesdoct00hodg
Title: Edward Hodges, doctor in music of Sydney Sussex College, Cambridge; organist … Bristol, England, 1819-1838; organist and director in Trinity Parish, New York, 1839-1859;
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Hodges, Faustina Hasse, 1823-1895 Dodds, E., Miss Hodges, J. Sebastian B. (John Sebastian Bach), 1830-1915, ed
Subjects: Hodges, Edward, 1796-1867
Publisher: New York [etc.] G.P. Putnam’s sons
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ussex College, Cam-bridge, as a Fellow Commoner, and proceeded tohis Doctorate there, without taking the degree ofBachelor previously, as is usual. In this he wasstrenuously opposed by Dr. Clark-Whitfield, Pro-fessor of Music at Cambridge, and organist ofHereford Cathedral. The Professor also advisedhim to go to Oxford for his degree. This arousedthe spirit of the sister university, and an effort wasimmediately made to get him entered at TrinityCollege. This was refused on the ground that nomusical degree was there given. Of the correspond-ence which ensued between the Professor, myFather, and the Rev. Dr. Guildford Waite, of St.Johns College, an old and valued friend of myFathers writes : Strange and almost incredible as it may appear, the young Bristol organist and musician, without 28 ■> 5 •> 3 ■> ■> ■» •) ^ •> 1 -> O. J 5 J ■>■>■>■> ■) J, « .1 o •> ■> J >3 5 ■> J ■) 1 1 ■>> ■>■> •> 3

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w> c f f f f c Iter ,r c « c < t rr «• 4 • f t O f • r, • ••• Doctors Degree at Cambridge 29 the culture and polish of a University course, standsout unmistakably superior, not only in the clear-cutsufficiency of his flawless English, but in ready, yetelegant, mastery of a perfect epistolary style. Henever loses his imperturbable patience ; his temperremains cool and collected ; he is never betrayedinto the natural and even justifiable pungency of adisputant who carries the most precious interests ofhis career in his hand. The letters of Mr. Hodgesexhibit a world of practical shrewdness, foresight,and the quiet assurance of one who is confident ofsuccess and victory. The key to the story of hissuccess is found in the lively personal interest thatDr. Waite had conceived in the brilliant reputationwhich Mr. Hodges had already achieved, which hadlong outgrown the critical and aesthetic appreciationof his provincial city. Although a cathedral city, that reputation ha

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Image from page 109 of “Mary Baldwin Seminary Bluestocking 1909” (1909)
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Identifier: marybaldwinsemin1909mary
Title: Mary Baldwin Seminary Bluestocking 1909
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Mary Baldwin College
Subjects: Mary Baldwin College MBC Mary Baldwin Seminary Augusta Female Seminary Yearbooks Bluestocking Baldwin’s Staunton, Virginia women’s colleges
Publisher: Mary Baldwin College
Contributing Library: Mary Baldwin College, Martha S. Grafton Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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See the tea-cher! Is she not sweet? She loves to takethe girls out walk-ing for the girls are always so nice andpo-lite. She does not be-lieve in hard stu-dies, so she givesvery short les-sons, and her work is very light for she hasno-thing to do but keep in a good hu-mor. She thinks allgirls should learn to cook over a gas-jet, and that prowl-ing a-round the halls after light bell is the best way to keep health and rules. The young ladies are all very shy and if, when out walk-ing,they re-fuse to bow to a strange gen-tle-man, they are se-vere-Iypun-ished. They must go to the of-fice and en-ter-tain this sameyoung man for two hours. The stu-dents are all com-pel-led towrite notes and let-ters to young men so as to im-prove their lit-er-arystyle.

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StjF (Enming of inrtnr Mattxt When first we heard of Doctor Moore To church that night we grumbling crept. We frowned, and fumed it was a bore — And then we stretched — and yawned — and slept. When one short week was almost oer To church with smiles we quick did speed. We fought for seats near Doctor MooreWho quickly won us to his creed. At Baldwins now the dullness palls. No feasts! no cooking! shocking sights!Were all P. C.s upon the halls, Forgotten gum and Kableites. Anne Sevmour Jones.

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Image from page 429 of “The poetical works of Thomas Hood. With a memoir of the author ..” (1873)
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Identifier: cu31924105428415
Title: The poetical works of Thomas Hood. With a memoir of the author ..
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Hood, Thomas, 1799-1845 Houghton, Richard Monckton Milnes, Baron, 1809-1885 Wordsworth Collection
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, James Miller
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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^ darling dear AleckYouve sent him oxalic ! ** Yes, yes, said the Doctor, I meant it for that 1 Then in comes another.Despatched by his mother,A blubbering brother.Who gives a rat-tat,—* O., poor little sisterHas kicked off a blister ! * Yes, yes, said the Doctor, I meant it for that 1 Now home comes the flunky,His own powder-monkey,

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THE VISION. 375 But dull as a donkey,— With basket and that,— * The draught for the Squire, sir. He chucked in the fire, sir,— ** Yes, yes,* said the Doctor, I meant it for that 1 * The next is the pompousHead Beadle, old Bumpus,—** Lord ! here is a rumpus :That pauper, Old Nat,In some drunken notionHas drunk up his lotion,—*** Yes, yes, said the Doctor, I meant it for that! At last comes a servant. In grief very fervent: •* Alas ! Dr. Derwent, Poor Master is flat! Hes drawn his last breath, sir,— That dose was his death, sir. * Yes, yes, said the Doctor, ** I meant it for that 1 THE VISION. Plague on*t ! the last was ill enough,This canuot but make better proof.—Cotton, As I sat the other night.Burning of a single light.All at once a change there cameIn the color of the flame. Strange it was the blaze to view. Blue as summer sky is blue : One ! two 1 three ! four ! five ! six ! seven !Eight! nine! ten ! it struck eleven ! Pale as sheet, with stifl*ened hair.Motionless

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Image taken from page 56 of ‘Poems by Robert Burns: with an account of his life [by Josiah Walker], and miscellaneous remarks on his writings. Containing also many poems and letters, not printed in Doctor Currie’s edition. [With engravings.]’
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Title: "Poems by Robert Burns: with an account of his life [by Josiah Walker], and miscellaneous remarks on his writings. Containing also many poems and letters, not printed in Doctor Currie’s edition. [With engravings.]", "Smaller Collections"
Author: Burns, Robert
Contributor: WALKER, Josiah – A.M
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 1465.h.10."
Volume: 02
Page: 56
Place of Publishing: Edinburgh
Date of Publishing: 1811
Publisher: Trustees of the late James Morison
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000543226

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Police Station. Bordertown. Opened 1930 but now part fo a cafe and information centre.
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Bordertown: regional capital.
Unlike Mundulla, Bordertown was surveyed as part of the Gold Escort Route and not in response to the declaration of the Tatiara Agricultural selection area in 1872. Bordertown was surveyed in 1852 after discussion between the Surveyor–General and Inspector Tolmer of the Gold Escort service. They chose a site near a well, on the banks of Tatiara Creek and on Cannawigara Station close to Mr Scott’ woolshed. Importantly they wanted a town site near the Victorian border. They surveyed a grid town with North, South, East and West terraces and streets named after local pastoralists- McLeod, Binnie, Scott and Woolshed after Scott’s woolshed! The town was to be a half way depot for the Gold Escort service. Of the 104 town lots offered for sale only 10 sold and they were to Mr Scott and two speculators. More sold later but no one bought land to develop or use. In 1854 two police officers were stationed at Bordertown and a small police station was built and a police paddock for their horses etc established. They were the only residents in Bordertown. In 1856 a store keeper arrived and opened a store in the town and the first house was built. Then in 1859 a block was purchased for a hotel, the Woolshed Inn and the first hotel licensed. Later in 1865 the publican took over the store as well. The population of Bordertown was not growing! A new police station was built in 1863 and in 1867 a local committee erected a small wooden school room. The town had a few residents only but the surrounding stations had more. This was the situation in Bordertown when the Tatiara Agricultural Area was declared in 1872. As so little development had occurred in the town a new town was surveyed and designed. The new town surveyed in 1871 had a surrounding parkland belt and suburban blocks of land beyond that. With time the suburban blocks were all converted into ¼ acre residential plots.

But one other resident of the district needs mentioning. In 1859 the owners of the main local stations Cannawigara, Wirrega, Nalang and Padthaway got together and decided they needed the services of a doctor and that they would encourage Dr Penny to take up residence in or near Bordertown. Dr Penny had practised in Robe since 1851 and the station owners offered him a fixed annual income to move to Bordertown. Dr Penny chose a site outside of the town, nearer to Mundulla for his home site which he called Charla. A block of land was taken from Binnie’s Wirrega station. Penny started building a substantial stone home in 1861 which was not completed until 1865. Behind the stone house was a wooden slab kitchen. Dr Penny had 40 acres of gardens and stabling for his horses around the house. With such improvements Dr Penny wanted the freehold for his land. Special permission had to be obtained for a survey not within one of the hundreds. In 1865 George Goyder authorised and conducted the survey himself of a 38 acre block for Dr Penny. It became section one of the Hundred of Tatiara in later years. Dr Penny practised from Charla until his death in 1887. The Penny’s had purchased freehold selector lands in the 1870s and his family remained at Charla and on this property until 1968.

Once the farmers moved into the Hundred of Tatiara and the rural population increased so did the township of Bordertown as a major service centre. The town grew slowly but surely until the 1950s when it was boosted further with the AMP development of lands near Keith and the introduction of trace elements to make the lands north of Bordertown productive pastoral country. The 1950s were also boom years for both wool and wheat prices and farmer prosperity resulted in town growth and prosperity. Unfortunately it was also the time when so many early buildings were demolished and replaced with 1960s style structures. Today Bordertown has a population of 2,500 and many functions of a regional centre such as saleyards, stock agents, state government offices, regional hospital and nursing home, high school, local abattoir, engineering works, fuel depots etc.

Bordertown Historical Walk.
Bordertown railway station. The rail yards were hives of activity in the early years with wheat stores, two rail gauges, railway dam, interstate and local trains and stock yards run by the major stock and station agents such as Elder Smith and Company. The first railway station for passengers was erected in 1883 but without a platform. This burnt down in a fire in 1889 and a wooden replacement station, with platform opened in 1890. In turn this was replaced by a fine Art Nouveau American design stone railway station in 1914.
Eudunda Farmers Cooperative Store. This group opened a general store in 1936 as their 39 ninth store in SA. They opened in an 1880s store which they remodelled in 1940. The store was further altered in 1955 and completely revamped in 1987. In 1989 the Eudunda Farmers store moved to another location in the town and became the Foodland store and it still operates as an IGA supermarket.
Bordertown Hotel. It was licensed early in 1869 in the western part of Bordertown but the business struggled in the late 19th century. Finally the hotel closed in 1893. Owners tried to get it relicensed for several years and were not successful until 1898. They then purchased a new site near the railway station for ease of access by travellers and a brand new two storey hotel opened in 1903. Its exterior is largely unaltered from that time.

1. Child Care Centre/Kindergarten/Hospital.
Like most country towns Bordertown had several private hospitals, usually run by local nurses before the government hospital opened in 1924 as the Tatiara Soldiers Memorial Hospital. It was enlarged in 1926/27 to increase the size to over 30 beds. In 1967 a new hospital was built with more than 42 beds. A two storey nurse’s home was constructed adjoining the hospital in 1972. It is now the Charla Nursing Home, named after the home of the district’s first Doctor, Dr Robert Penny. After World War Two many SA communities wanted to adopt the relatively new trend of having a town kindergarten for pre-school age children. After lots of local fund raising Bordertown opened a kindergarten in 1955 on the corner of Patterson Street. It is now the Child Care Centre.

2. Lutheran Church.
Lutheran church services began in Lutheran homes, conducted by the Lutheran minister from Dimboola in Victoria, in the early 1930s. A Lutheran minister was stationed in Bordertown from 1939 but no church was built at that time. A second Lutheran synod also began regular Lutheran services in Bordertown from the late 1930s. At one stage Lutheran services were held in the Methodist Church. In 1950 both congregations met and decided to build a joint church for both synods and this was completed in 1953. Separate Lutheran services were held in the one church until formal amalgamation of the two synods in 1965 and the formation of Trinity Lutheran church in 1967. The church was too small for the combined congregations and so the 1953 church was demolished and replaced with a grand new church in 1985.

3. Anglican Church.
Anglican services began in 1880 in Bordertown but the first church was not opened until 1887. A fine stone rectory was erected next to the church in 1907. A vestry was added in 1925 and a stone hall in 1961. Surprisingly the church was not consecrated until a visit by the Anglican bishop in 1936. It is unusual in that the entrance is now at the rear of the church.

4. Methodist/Uniting Church.
Wesleyan Methodist services began in Bordertown around 1882 but a church was not built until 1887. An adjoining parsonage was built in 1897 but it has since been demolished and replaced (1961.) A new church hall was opened in 1963 and the old church has been much altered.

5. Masonic Lodge/Temple.
This strange looking building in DeCourcey Street began as the Masonic Lodge. It was opened in 1926 after being built by one of the local members. The Lodge was formed in Bordertown in 1911 and it met for years in the Institute building. Note the pillar and curved brick entrance. By 1926 the Lodge had obviously decided it was allowed to have windows facing the street. It had a large hall about 50 feet by 30 feet and a couple of meeting and supper rooms. It closed in 2008 and was sold in 2011. Note the symmetry of the façade; strong brick quoins and bricks across the roof line to give two identical almost square sections beside the entrance. It is an interesting structure.

6. Churches of Christ.
The first home services of the churches of Christ started in the Tatiara in 1882 with the origins of their building fund going back to 1890. A church opened at Carew in the Tatiara in 1899. The first Bordertown church opened in 1905, built by church members and a fine manse was completed in 1912. In 1953 a second church was built on their town land. This 1953 church is now used as a hall. The old 1905 church was demolished in 1963 and a new church of red brick replaced it in 1965. It still serves the Churches of Christ community in Bordertown.

7. Former Congregational Church.
The Congregational Church was erected 1880; the porch was added in 1924, and the hall was erected 1926. In 1966 a porch was added to link the church and the hall. Reverend David Milne was the first minister in this region. He visited Bordertown in 1862 and held the first services in the Woolshed Inn. He lived in Kingston with his second wife with whom he had seven children to complement the four from his first marriage. He travelled regularly to the Bordertown district for many years until he moved here with his family in 1873 after the Tatiara Agricultural Area was declared. He then continued with services and pushed for the erection of a Congregational Church which took another seven years to accomplish. He also serviced the Congregational Church in Mundalla and in Cannawigara and other small settlements. He continued preaching and he undertook Congregational Missionary work until 1910 when he died aged 83 years. The Congregational church closed when it amalgamated with the Methodist church to form the Uniting Church in Bordertown in 1971. It is now leased by the Naracoorte funeral parlour.

8. Old School Room.
Bordertown Old Primary School. The local wooden school room opened in 1867 only to be replaced with a stone room in 1874. The Education Department added another couple of rooms to create a T shaped school in 1884 as the school enrolments rose once the farmers arrived in the Tatiara. When the government started up the first country high schools Bordertown was one of the first when it opened in 1913 in the original 1874 classroom. The first teacher in charge was a woman but the high school closed in 1916 because of World War One. Few boys were left in the school as these younger ones had to work full time on the family farms as older boys had gone to war. High school classes resumed in Bordertown in 1920 and two new classrooms were added to the school for their use in 1921. The revamped high school became a Higher Primary School in 1922. From 1939 the Higher Primary classes occupied the 1884 classrooms as well as the 1921 rooms. In 1959 the government made the decision to separate the primary and high schools and the primary school moved to a new school site in 1971. The old school complex is used as club rooms for several town organisations.

9. Old Catholic Church.
Bordertown was added to the Catholic parish of Penola from its first surveying in 1852. After the 1872 farm selection act the parish priests from Penola visited more often. Catholic services in Bordertown began at the Woolshed Inn in 1881. A foundation stone for a Catholic Church was laid in 1883 and opened in 1884. This impressive church still stands albeit as a private residence. The limestone walls are an impressive 22 inches thick. The first resident priest for Bordertown arrived in 1939.

10. New Catholic Church.
When the first priest arrived in 1939 he purchased five acres of land for a Catholic School which was eventually built. The priest worked on building his own presbytery and it was completed in 1954 next to the church. A new St. Mary’s Catholic Church as opened in 1969. The old church was used as a hall for some time.

11. Council Offices.
The original Council Chamber for the district was in Mundulla. It closed in 1904 when the stone and brick chamber opened in Bordertown. This fine old building was demolished in 1959 when the new Council Offices were opened. A further two storey structure was added in 1978. Outside of the Council Offices is a bust of Prime Minister Robert Hawke donated in 1987 and unveiled by Bob Hawke’s father who returned to the town in which he had formerly served. In the foyer of the Council Offices is a painting of Hawke in the Hawke Gallery. The Council has an art gallery.
12. Old Institute and current Library.
Bordertown Institute. A local committee was formed and after several years of discussions and fund raising an institute was opened in 1878. Prior to this the library facility had been located in the 1867 school classroom until the Education Department took over that school and wanted to charge high rents for the library room. The Institute was increased in size and a new façade and new front rooms in the classical style with a grand pediment were added in 1909. The Premier of the day Mr Peake opened the new Institute. Yet another new institute hall was opened in 1960 again with the opening ceremony by the Premier of the day who was Sir Thomas Playford on that occasion. The extensions included a new town library. Many organisations held their meetings here and it was also the location of many private and official town functions. A theatre was added to the Institute/Library complex in 1982.

13. Hawke House.
This building opened in 1888 as the first national Bank in Bordertown. In 1897 it was sold to the Congregational Church as a manse and much later Prime Minister Bob (or Robert) Hawke was born here in December 1929. Presumably he was conceived here too as Clement and Ella Hawkes occupied this manse in 1928. The Reverend Hawke left Bordertown in 1935 and Bob Hawke started school at Maitland Primary School on Yorke Peninsula. The Hawkes left Maitland in 1939 and moved to Perth. Bob Hawke then undertook his secondary education at Perth Modern School before going on to the University of Western Australia. The school established in 1911 is a government school for academically gifted students. Hawke House is now owned by the Uniting Church and used as a welfare centre. Opposite Hawke House is the Apex Park which was originally designated as McLaren Place by the surveyor of the town in 1852 who was John McLaren. Look for the sculpture done by Bordertown High School students in 1999 and the mural done by Bordentown Primary School students in 1996. The mural on the Library wall was done by the High School students.

14. Woolshed Inn.
This was the first hotel licensed in Bordertown in 1859 and it was so named because it was close to John and Charles Scott’s woolshed for their Cannawigara station. In 1882 the early structures were added to with a new single storey hotel. As fashions and interests changed the Woolshed Inn became the Tatiara Hotel in 1927 but it reverted to the historic Woolshed Inn name in 1969. The original 1859 building with its 12 paned window can be seen in the yard of the current hotel.

15. Police/Information Centre/Tolmer Park.
This spot was originally the police paddock from 1854. Police have always been stationed on the corner. The toilets are called the Old Gaol but there was never a gaol, only a couple of cells in conjunction with the police station which was usual in any country towns. The Information Centre is here and inside you can see the front of the old police station built in 1930. The first police building was erected early in 1854- a mere shack. In 1863 the first proper police station costing £300 was built. In 1930 another new police station was built and the third station was put up in 1963. The old 1863 station was then demolished and the 1930 station was turned into a police residence. In 1983 the fourth police station was opened along the street. The old police paddock is now Tolmer Recreation Park. It was fenced in 1857 to stop the troopers’ horses from straying. The last Gold Escort service left here in December 1853. The police were then on their own with little to do. Look for the white kangaroos which have been bred from a single white male obtained in 1980 on the road towards Melbourne and read the information boards around Tolmer Park.

Image from page 419 of “Redskin and cow-boy; a tale of the western plains” (1891)
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Identifier: redskincowboytalhent
Title: Redskin and cow-boy; a tale of the western plains
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Henty, G. A. (George Alfred), 1832-1902
Subjects:
Publisher: London, Blackie
Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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eek specimens in natural history, and their adventures there are fullof interest and excitement. The descriptions of Mr. Ebony, their black-comrade, and of the scenes of savage life sparkle with genuine humour. This book encourages independence of character, develops resource, and teachesa boy to keep his eyes open.—Saturday Review. — Yussuf the Guide* with 6 page Illustrations by J- SCHONBERG. 2s- A lad who has been almost given over by the doctors, but who rapidlyrecovers health and strength in a journey through Asia Minor with hisguardians and Yussuf as their guide. Their adventures culminate in theirbeing snowed up for the winter in the mountains, from which they escapewhile their captors are waiting for the ransom that does not come. This story is told with such rea! freshness and vigour that the reader ftels he isactually one of the party sharing in the fun and facing the dangers w.th them. —Pail Mall Gazette From THE DRAGON OF PEK1NBy Capt. F. S. Brereton. 5^. (Seepage 11

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WITH A SHOUT HE THREW HIMSELF UPON THE MAN BEARINGTHE SWORD BL A OKIES STORY BOOKS FOR BOYS Dr. GORDON STABLES, R.N. In Far Bolivia : ^toiy of a Strange Wild Land. With 6 page Illustrations by J.FlNNEMORE, R.I. y. 6d. Life on the beautiful plantation on the banks of the great Amazon flowsgently and dreamily on, until the abduction of the heroine by Boliviansavages. Then the stir indeed begins, and the adventures of the rescue-party, in which the heroines boy cousin and his chum are the movingspirits, are the subject of an enthralling narrative. Written in Dr. Gordon Stables best style.—Yorkshire Herald. An exciting and altogether admirable story.—Sheffield Telegraph. -In Quest of the Giant Sloth. With6fr»-Paf ^* Illustrations by J. FlNNEMORE, R.I. Cloth elegant, y. 6rf. The hero and his companions set out to find that most marvellousSouth American survival—the Giant Sloth. In the course of their eventfuljourney they meet many strange animals, and men far wilder than thebeasts t

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Image from page 213 of “Science in story. Sammy Tubbs, the boy doctor, and “Sponsie,” the troublesome monkey” (1874)

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Image from page 213 of “Science in story. Sammy Tubbs, the boy doctor, and “Sponsie,” the troublesome monkey” (1874)
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Identifier: scienceinstorysa00foot
Title: Science in story. Sammy Tubbs, the boy doctor, and "Sponsie," the troublesome monkey
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors: Foote, Edward B. (Edward Bliss), 1829-1906
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Murray Hill Publishing Co.

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CHAPTER X. BAD NEWS—THE RETARDATOR AND ACCELERA-TOR NERVES—A TRAGEDY IN SHIN-BONEALLEY–THE DEATH OF SOME PETS—SAMMYSSORROW—THE DOCTOR DIVERTS HIS MINDWITH INTERESTING CONVERSATION RESPECT-ING OUR NERVOUS TELEGRAPH, AND HOW WELEARN TO USE IT—THE STRANGE RESOLU-TION OF SAMMY. USH! hush! Be quiet!my young readers. I havesome bad news to com-municate ! I hardly knowjust how I should break itto you, for physiologyteaches us that the ner-vous bridle which thebrain puts on the heartbecomes more or less un-manageable when anygreat or sudden emotionof the mind occurs. Thatis, it fails more than ever to be controlled by the

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THE TROUBLESOME MONKEY. 209 will. It is through this involuntary action of therctardator and accelerator nerves belonging to thepncumogastric pair, that life is endangered some-times by the sudden communication of either sor-rowful or over-joyful news. We should be verycareful, therefore, in our intercourse with nervouslysensitive people, not to seriously disturb the har-monious action of those nerves which reach downfrom the brain, and communicate all its emotions°f J°y> grief, horror, surprise, anger, and fear.It is a common peculiarity of the human mind tolike to surprise people with either good or badnews, or to visit them unexpectedly. Look outthat this inclination is not gratified at the expense*of the health and perhaps life of those with whomyou associate. Now, how shall I tell you the distressing newswhich you must know some time unless I cut mynarrative short by abruptly closing this volumewithout an additional word ? I will see if I canlead you along so as to gradually

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Image from page 177 of “McCarver and Tacoma” (1906)
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Identifier: mccarvertacoma00pros
Title: McCarver and Tacoma
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Prosch, Thomas Wickham, 1850-1915
Subjects: McCarver, Morton Matthew, 1807-1875 Tacoma (Wash.) — History
Publisher: Seattle, Lowman & Hanford
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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60 The Early Carr, Miss Marietta Carr, Frank Spinning, Mrs. Amanda Spin-ning, Lucius V. Starr, James W. King, Thomas Hood, DavidCanfield, James W. Law, William Mahon, William P. Byrd,M. M. McCarver, Mrs. Julia A. McCarver, Miss Virginia Mc-Carver, Miss Elizabeth M. McCarver and Miss Naomi Mc-Carver. On the Puyallup Indian Reservation were C. H.Spinning, the doctor; Thomas Elder, the farmer; A. W. Stew-

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Tacoma Harbar in 1868. Map of Land Claims Tacoma Townsite. art, the carpenter; John Flett, the blacksmith : and WilliamClendenin, the storekeeper. These men all had families. TheClendenin store was a great convenience to the people up thevalley, as well as to those on the harbor. The latter went to itin boats and canoes for their clothing, hardware and groceries.From the country they came with their butter and eggs. Whenhe had accumulated a goodly supply of these products, lie Histcry of Tacoma I 61 would get together his Indian crew, load up his big canoe, androw and sail to Seattle, whore he would exchange his producefor things needed on the shelves of his store. Life on the !>uthai summer was. in its quietude, in strange contrast with thenoise of to-day. Indians could he heard talking a mile away,while the rowing of a boat could easily he heard two miles.( >ne foggy evening tin- steamer Eliza Anderson came in, onher way from Victoria to Olympia. She repeatedly blew herwhistl

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Image taken from page 5 of ‘Ricerche storiche sulla Lomellina’
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Title: "Ricerche storiche sulla Lomellina"
Author: COLLI, Antonio.
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10131.dd.16."
Page: 5
Place of Publishing: Mortara
Date of Publishing: 1881
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000745620

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London October 30 2016 (38) Doctor Strange
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Shots of my Grandfather’s old dentist bag, full of strange smelling powders, sanding disks, and way too many dentist’s tools.

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Image from page 199 of “Edward Hodges, doctor in music of Sydney Sussex College, Cambridge; organist … Bristol, England, 1819-1838; organist and director in Trinity Parish, New York, 1839-1859;” (1896)
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Identifier: edwardhodgesdoct00hodg
Title: Edward Hodges, doctor in music of Sydney Sussex College, Cambridge; organist … Bristol, England, 1819-1838; organist and director in Trinity Parish, New York, 1839-1859;
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Hodges, Faustina Hasse, 1823-1895 Dodds, E., Miss Hodges, J. Sebastian B. (John Sebastian Bach), 1830-1915, ed
Subjects: Hodges, Edward, 1796-1867
Publisher: New York [etc.] G.P. Putnam’s sons
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
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return. He had a magnetic hold on his choir. It was avery different thing to any other Church engage-ment. He took them as human nature as well assingers. There was one faithful bass whose voicewas not acceptable, and whose pocket was low :and my Father gently silenced him and paid himon from his own pocket. There was an old dog named Bouncer downat Trinity, and every Sunday morning my Fatherput a * cracker in his pocket for Bouncer.Bouncer died at last, and the Sexton so grieved athis loss, that my Father gave him another dog.This was an intelligent dog, a real church dog.During service he lay In the porch ; and when My Fathers Three Organs 141 service was over, he would guard the entranceunder the organ, suffering no stranger to remaininside who did not remove his hat. After I had some Httle organ experience I saidto my Father, ** Sir, I have beaten you at last ! ** Very extraordinary ! he said. What haveyou done ? I have played the people out, Sir. (Something my Father never did.)

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CHAPTER XII. DR. HODGES AT ST. PAULs CHAPEL AND TRINITY CHURCH. MY Father had great power at the organ ingoverning a large body of people singing.He said it was an art, but to him it seemed nature. It was evinced grandly on one occasion, onwhich the writer was present, and one never to beforgotten, viz., the Convention held in St. PaulsChapel, during which that scene took place whichinaugurated the painful drama ending in the sus-pension of our esteemed Bishop of New York.The Church was crowded in every part and intenseexcitement prevailed; the Bishop on this occasionhaving maintained his position with a decision andmanliness seldom witnessed. Giving no time forfurther remark, he said, in a full tone of voice, Let the Gloria in Excelsis now be sung ! Before my Father could get to the keys, or rap for wind, this hymn was begun by a voice below, and taken up by many others. I watched my Father as he first felt softly for the key in which 142 At St. Pauls and Trinity 143 they were singin

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Museum of Superhero and Comic Art (MOSCA)©. General layout of building. Minifigure display cabinet in open position.

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Shots of my Grandfather’s old dentist bag, full of strange smelling powders, sanding disks, and way too many dentist’s tools.