Image from page 626 of “Trans-Himalaya; discoveries and adventures in Tibet” (1909)

A few nice doctor strange images I found:

Image from page 626 of “Trans-Himalaya; discoveries and adventures in Tibet” (1909)
doctor strange
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Identifier: transhimalayadis02hedi
Title: Trans-Himalaya; discoveries and adventures in Tibet
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Hedin, Sven Anders, 1865-1952
Subjects: Tibet (China) — Description and travel
Publisher: London : Macmillan and co., ltd.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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and the next we went down as far, so that thedistance was at least double as great as it appeared on themap, and Abdul Kerim reached Leh long before I wasnear Simla. Therefore the first news of us came from him,and not from myself, and in some quarters the worst fearswere entertained for my safety. It seemed strange thatmy servants reached their home safe and sound whileI myself was still missing. We parted with fioods of tears on August i, and my partytravelled past the three monasteries, Dongbo, Dava, andMangnang (Illust. 382), and came to Totling-gompa onthe 13th, near which Father Andrade, three hundred yearsago, lodged in the now decayed town of Tsaparang. HereI met the Hindu doctor Mohanlal, who gave me the firstnews of the outer world. Through him I heard, with deepregret, of the death of King Oscar, which had occurredmore than eight months before. Mohanlal also informedme of the growing unrest in India and of the anxiety myfriends felt on my account. Thakur Jai Chand had been

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385. My Puppy.

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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doctor strange
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Image from page 152 of “La comedie humaine” (1896)
doctor strange
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: lacomedie33balz
Title: La comedie humaine
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Balzac, Hono 1799-1850 Wormeley, Katharine Prescott Ives, George Burnham, 1856-1930
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston : Little, Brown
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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far-seeingglance of the truly superior man weighed upon Dinah,who did not admit her pettiness to herself. The doctor may be more of a man than the journal-ist, she said to herself, but I dont like him sowell. Then she thought of the obligations of the profession,and wondered whether a woman could ever be anythingelse than a subject in the eyes of a physician, who seesso many subjects during his day! The first branch ofthe thought written by Bianchon in her album was theresult of a professional observation which fell too straightupon womankind for Dinah not to be struck by it. Andlastly, Bianchon, whose large practice forbade him toprolong his stay, was to leave on the morrow. Whatwoman, unless with Cupids fabled arrow quivering inher heart, can make up her mind in so short a time! These trivial things, which bring about great catas-trophes, once seen in bulk by Bianchon, he told Lou-steau in four words the strange opinion he had formedconcerning Madame de La Baudraye, which caused the

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The Muse of the Department. 133 journalist the keenest surprise. While the two Parisianswere whispering together, a tempest arose against thehostess among the Sancerrois, who had no comprehen-sion either of the paraphrase or of Lousteaus com-ments. Far from seeing therein the romance that theprocureur du roi, the sub-prefect, Lebas the first deputy,M. de La Baudraye, and Dinah had deduced from it, allthe women gathered about the tea-table could see naughtbut a mystification, and accused the Muse of Sancerreof having had a share in it. They had all expectedto pass a charming evening, and had strained to nopurpose their mental faculties. Nothing disgusts thepeople of the provinces more than the idea of beingused as a plaything for Parisians. Madame Piedefer left the tea-table to say to herdaughter: – Pray go and speak to those ladies; theyre verymuch offended by your conduct. Lousteau could not forbear to remark Dinahs mani-fest superiority to the elite of the women of Sancerre:she was

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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